• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Bibliography And Sources Cited Format

For the detailed information on citing sources using MLA style with many more examples, please use the official MLA Handbook:


 

All information relating to MLA style as presented on this Web site has been based on this authoritative publication from the Modern Language Association of America.

Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook. 6th ed. New York: MLA, 2003.

Works Cited is sometimes referred to as References. These terms mean the same thing. Each is an alphabetical list of works cited, or works to which you have made reference. Works Cited is generally used when citing sources using MLA (Modern Language Association) style, while the title References is used when citing sources using APA (American Psychological Association) style.

MLA Works Cited and Bibliography are not the same. In Works Cited you only list items you have actually cited. In a Bibliography you list all of the material you have consulted in preparing your essay whether or not you have actually cited the work.

Entries in Works Cited, References, or Bibliography are put in alphabetical order by last names of authors, editors, translators, etc. or by first words of titles.

Special info about MLA bibliography example.

If the first word of the title is “The“, “A“, or “An“, and the word is being used as an article, e.g., in the title: The Little Book of Irish Clans, the entry is placed under “Little” and the article “The” is ignored. In the title: A Is for Apple, however, the entry is placed under A since A is used as a noun and not as an article in this case.

Sometimes the article “The” is used as part of the name of a company or magazine or journal for emphasis, e.g., The Champ, or The Sports Network. For Internet sites, use the URL as a guide. If “theyellowpages” is used in the URL, treat “The” as part of the title, and list “The Yellow Pages” alphabetically under “The“. If “edge” and not “theedge” is used in the URL, list the magazine title “The Edge” under “Edge” and treat “The” as an article and ignore it.

Where appropriate, a cross reference may be used to direct readers to the proper location, e.g. Yellow Pages, The See The Yellow Pages.

Remember:

1. DO NOT number entries.

2. DO NOT list citations separately by categories. All references are placed in ONE ALPHABETICAL LIST by first words of citations, regardless of where citations come from.

3. Begin on a new page. Start on the 6th line from the top (or 1″ down from the top of the paper), center, and type one of the following titles: Works Cited, References, or Bibliography. Double space after the title. List all entries in alphabetical order by the first word, taking into consideration the rules governing titles that begin with articles.

4. Begin the first line of each entry flush at the left margin. Keep typing until you run out of room at the end of the line. Indent 5 spaces for second and subsequent lines of the same entry. Double-space all lines, both within and between entries. Remember that this is only a guideline adapted from the MLA Handbook. You are advised to follow the style preferred by your instructor.

Work Cited Vs Works Cited

There is a mistake that students often tend to make. They name their reference page the Work Cited page, which is incorrect. The proper name for it should be Works Cited, as the works by multiple authors, not one, are cited. The Works Cited page is often used in the Humanities, the MLA Style and the APA Style.

 

Format of the MLA Works Cited Page in MLA 7

Quick facts:

  • The Works Cited list typically appears at the end of a paper.
  • Name the page “Works Cited.” While “Bibliography” and “Literature Cited” are sometimes used, Works Cited is often the most appropriate.
    • An Annotated Bibliography is different than a Works Cited list. An annotated bibliography includes brief summaries and evaluations of the sources. Check out our page on Annotated Bibliographies to learn more.
  • Make the Works Cited page the next consecutive page number. If the last page of your project is page 12, the Works Cited list will be page 13.

Format of the Paper:

  1. Use one-inch margins around the paper. Double-space the entire document.
  2. Place the title of the page (Works Cited) in the center of the page, an inch from the top.
  3. Create a double space between the title (Works Cited) and the first citation.
  4. Each citation should start on the left margin (one inch from the side of the paper).
  5. For longer citations, indent the second and any subsequent lines one half inch from the beginning of the citation. This is called a hanging citation.

Example of a hanging citation:

Kondō, Marie. The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese

             Art of Decluttering and Organizing. New York: Ten Speed,

             2014. Print.

 

Format of Citations:

  1. Place citations in alphabetical order by the author’s last name. If there are two works by the same author, alphabetize by the last name of the second author (if there is one). If there is only the single author, alphabetize by the title of the work.

Two or More Works by the Same Author

If there are two works by the same author, it is not necessary to type out their full name for each citation. Instead, type out the full name in the first citation only. For all subsequent citations, in place of the name, type three hyphens with a period at the end.

 

Example:

 

Sparks, Nicholas. The Notebook. New York: Warner, 1996. Print.

 

—. A Walk to Remember. New York, NY: Warner, 1999.
Print.

 

If the author is listed along with another author, type out the full name of each author, do not use the hyphens and periods.

 

Example:

 

Sparks, Nicholas. The Notebook. New York: Warner, 1996. Print.

 

—. A Walk to Remember. New York, NY: Warner, 1999.
              Print.

 

Sparks, Nicholas, and Micah Sparks. Three Weeks with My Brother.


              New York: Warner, 2004. Print.

 

Two or More Works by the Same Authors:

 

When there are two or more works by multiple authors, use hyphens and periods.

 

Example:

 

Rosenthal, Amy Krouse, and Tom Lichtenheld. Duck! Rabbit! San

             Francisco: Chronicle, 2009. Print.

—. Exclamation Mark.

             New York: Scholastic, 2013. Print.

 

Don’t forget, you can create your MLA citations quickly and easily on EasyBib.

For more information on creating your MLA Works Cited page, check out Writing Commons and Illinois Valley Community College’s website.

One thought on “Bibliography And Sources Cited Format

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *